Thursday, October 23, 2014
   
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Public hearing on lagoon gets no input

An opportunity to ask questions, offer input and hear details about how the village of Brady plans to address state mandated sewer lagoon repairs came and went without a single public comment.

Village trustees hosted a public hearing during a special meeting on July 24 to allow resident interaction.

Instead, the board breezed through five agenda items, all relating to the lagoon, in roughly 35 minutes.

In 2009, the village was ordered by the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality to bring the sewage lagoon up to the current standard, which allows one-eighth inch seepage or less per day.

In 2009, tests showed the lagoons seeped several times the allowable amount.

Progress toward a solution has been slow but trustees were pushed forward by a letter from DEQ last month demanding proof the village is taking action.

Reed Miller of Miller & Associates of Kearney, the village’s engineering firm for the lagoon project, presented a timeline for the board.

He said although his deadlines don’t match DEQ’s, he has been in contact with the state office and is confident a compromise can be worked out.

The timeline begins with a calibrated flow meter and preliminary design in September with video data collection through cleaning and televising the sewer lines this winter.

“We’d like to have the groundwater as high as possible when we televise,” Miller said. “Hopefully we can do that in January or February.”

After all the data is collected, Miller expects to have a final design by the fall of 2013 with bids let late next year and construction to begin in early 2014.

“I think this is a reasonable schedule,” the engineer said. “It puts you done with everything by December 2014.”

The next step in the design process is to have geotechnical data collected from the lagoon floor and a flow meter installed on the pump to more accurately determine how much waste water is pumped into the lagoon each day.

Trustees approved a bid for $2,000 from ISG & Associates of Omaha to do the geotechnical work and will collect additional bids for the flow meter before the August meeting.

Trustees also signed the engineering agreement with Miller & Associates and approved a resolution which authorizes the board chairman and village clerk to sign all documents related to a U.S. Department of Agriculture low-interest loan.

The $1.46 million loan was secured now so the village can take advantage of a low-interest option.

In conjunction with that, the board also hired the Rembolt Ludtke law firm of Lincoln to serve as the village’s bond attorney.